Elena:

There exists something in this world which is particularly relaxing. I am talking about the sound of rushing water. Have you ever stopped by a mill and closed your eyes while listening to that? I did and I think there is a magic in those moments. I used to walk to the mills during summertime. There I used to find some rest from the hot and humid weather. The repeated bubbling of the water would produce a movement that generated a pleasant breeze. It is impressive how clear Treviso still appears in my memory. Its pictoresque streets, its canals and the sound of the mills. That sound was the soundtrack to my many walking tours around the town. Furthermore, the view was always extremely romantic, no matter what the season was. I would find people kissing each other there. Lovers holding hands. Artists making a painting. Others would stop by and perhaps notice someone looking at the water or just enjoying its sound. That someone could have been me. If you are going to visit Treviso, I suggest you to take a walk along the canals while not missing the precious mills. You will find a proposal for a tour with some information about the various mills hereafter. Get ready to your holiday to Treviso by reading all our articles in this section! Enjoy the reading!

Valentina - Around & About Treviso:

The calm Sile river surrounds Treviso and its headwaters are few minutes drive from the city centre. Its shores attest the work of farmers, hunters and fishermen during the ages. And actually many trades have been transmitted for generations along with the slow passing by of time. The historic centre of Treviso is characterized by a maze of channels that chase each other, intersect, appear and disappear under the narrow streets and medieval buildings, in a constant gurgling sound that soothes the spirits of locals as well as turists. And therefore with my mobile in my hand I went water mills hunting, looking for wheels still moved by the water making Treviso even more unique. Four I found, but I'm pretty sure there are others hiding here and there.

The rush of water near Ponte San Francesco whispers us that the first water mill is right there. To me this is one of the most picturesque corners in Treviso, take some time just to enjoy and admire the elegance of the city itself.

A few steps forward towards the Pescheria isle you bump into another waterwheel caressed by the Cagnan river and one more amazing view discloses right in front of you. Going ahead with my "water mills hunting" let's cross the Pescheria isle, where every morning you can buy fresh fish coming from the near Adriatic Sea. And another wheel is moved by the stream.

After a quick gaze at Piazza dei Battuti, I walk through the University area and the Quartiere Latino, where your eyes are cought by the tangled streams till you find a wheel that is slowly moved by the running of water.

The Sile river has always been an important way of communication between Treviso and Venice. This can be seen by "I Buranelli" neighbourhood, where a sixteenth-century building used to be home and warehouse of merchants coming from the lagoon isle of Burano. Water was an essential element for Treviso, and along the Sile river a number of water mills grind the flour to be brought to Venice.

Still the Sile river connects Treviso to the Adriatic Sea, and by cycling or for the more adventurous running along the Greenway del Sile, you can enjoy wonderful marsh landscapes until you breathe the salty breeze coming from the Sea. Meanwhile have you found out another water wheel in town? Let me know and I'll add it to our map!

Photo credits: Valentina Facchin. All rights reserved.
Photo credits: Valentina Facchin. All rights reserved.
Photo credits: Valentina Facchin. All rights reserved.
Photo credits: Valentina Facchin. All rights reserved.
Photo credits: Valentina Facchin. All rights reserved.